Case Study - Goat Pasture Management

NAME: Helen Darlington

PROPERTY NAME: Yarrabee

PROPERTY LOCATION: Goombungee, Queensland

PROPERTY SIZE: 250ha

NUMBER OF GOATS: 300-600

MAIN GOAT ENTERPRISE: Boer goat stud

TARGET MARKET: Export breeding-stock markets – stud Boer does and bucks Domestic breeding-stock markets – stud and commercial Boer bucks

SECOND GOAT ENTERPRISE: Boer cross goat enterprises

TARGET MARKET: Export breeding-stock . . . → Read More: Case Study – Goat Pasture Management

Case Study - Goat Rangeland Grazing

NAME: Will Scott

PROPERTY NAME: Wynyangoo Station and Narndee Station

PROPERTY LOCATION: Mount Magnet, Western Australia

PROPERTY SIZE: 387,200ha

NUMBER OF GOATS: 25,000 – 45,000

MAIN GOAT ENTERPRISE: Meat

TARGET MARKET: Export trade – live goats and carcases

Will operates a free-range grazing system. The herd is dominated by females, with the exception of . . . → Read More: Case Study – Goat Rangeland Grazing

Palatability of plants commonly eaten by goats.

This article details the palatability of  trees, shrubs, herbs, grasses and rushes to goats into four categories; highly palatable, palatable, moderately palatable and eaten occaisionally.

Having read through these tables and identified plants from your area, you should check for any toxicity issues by reference to the article Plants Toxic to Goats.

Trees and Shrubs . . . → Read More: Palatability of plants commonly eaten by goats.

Fodder Assessment for Goats.

When you have established the feed requirements of your goats, you will need to determine the quality and quantity of forage and/or supplements required to fulfil these requirements and the availability and consistency of your forage supply. This article guides you through forage assessment, management and grazing strategies for temperate pastures and for rangelands.

Quality . . . → Read More: Fodder Assessment for Goats.

Plants Toxic to Goats

It is important that you are able to recognise those plants in your area that are toxic, particularly those which are toxic to goats. In terms of managing the threat posed by toxic plants there are a number of factors that you need to consider:

• Poisonous plants may include pasture species at certain . . . → Read More: Plants Toxic to Goats

Goats - Nutritional Disorders

This article will help you to identify and manage the following nutritional disorders that can occur in goats.

Bloat Grain poisoning Copper deficiency Selenium deficiency Cobalt deficiency Iodine deficiency Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency

This summary provides details of the prevailing conditions under which each problem is likely to occur, explains how to diagnose the . . . → Read More: Goats – Nutritional Disorders