Fibre Crops


Fibre crop Baler

WHAT ARE FIBRE CROPS?

Fibre crops are field crops grown for their fibres, which are traditionally used to make paper, cloth, or rope.

The fibres may be chemically modified, like in viscose or cellophane. In recent years materials scientists have begun exploring further use of these fibres in composite materials.

Fibre crops are generally harvestable after a single growing season, as distinct from trees, which are typically grown for many years before being harvested for wood pulp fibre. In specific circumstances, fibre crops can be superior to wood pulp fibre in terms of technical performance, environmental impact or cost.

Botanically, the fibres havested from many of these plants are bast fibres; the fibres come from the phloem tissue of the plant. The other fibre crop fibres are seed padding, leaf fibre, or other parts of the plant.

There are a number of issues regarding the use of fibre crops to make pulp. One of these is seasonal availability. While trees can be harvested continuously, many field crops are harvested once during the year and must be stored such that the crop doesn’t rot over a period of many months. Considering that many pulp mills require several thousand tonnes of fibre source per day, storage of the fibre source can be a major issue.

Various Fibre crops

This section includes articles on VARIOUS FIBRE CROPS.

For convenience, the section has been sub-categorised into the following headings. Please click on the hyperlinks in Blue to go to these links:

Bast fibres (Stem-skin fibres)

Jute

Flax

Ramie

Hemp

Kenaf

Kenaf

Abacá

Nettles


Other Leaf, fruit, and other fibres

Cotton

Bamboo fibre

Esparto

Kapok

Milkweed

Papaya

Cotton Boll

Umbrella plant

Coir

Sisal